New BECP prototype models show real-world applications of energy-saving technologies

As the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) continues its efforts to improve energy codes and make them more efficient, we're also working on other ways to help you save energy and money. One way we're doing this is by developing prototype building models that incorporate the latest energy-saving technologies and practices.

These models are designed to show how the latest energy codes can be used in real-world applications, and they can be used by builders, architects, and code officials to plan and design more energy-efficient buildings. The models also show how different building components and systems interact to create a more efficient overall system.

We're currently working on prototypes for both residential and commercial buildings, and we hope to have them available soon. In the meantime, if you have any questions about the BECP or energy codes in general, please don't hesitate to contact us. We're always happy to help!

The new Building Energy Conservation Prototype (BECP) models showcase how energy-saving technologies can be used in real-world buildings.

The past few years have seen a new type of model emerge in the building energy conservation field: the Building Energy Conservation Prototype (BECP). BECPs are designed to showcase how cutting-edge energy-saving technologies can be implemented in real-world buildings. One of the latest BECPs to be released is the "ZEROWaste Home," developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

The ZEROWaste Home is a multifamily residential building located in Oakland, California. It was designed to demonstrate how zero waste principles can be applied to an entire building, from construction and materials to operations and maintenance.

Some of the innovative features of the ZEROWaste Home include:

  • All construction waste was diverted from landfills
  • Recycled and sustainable materials were used throughout the building
  • Water-conserving fixtures and appliances were installed
  • Low-emitting paint, adhesives, and sealants were used

The ZEROWaste Home is just one example of the many different types of BECPs that are being developed. These models provide a valuable resource for architects, engineers, and builders who are looking for ways to make their buildings more energy-efficient.

The BECP models are located at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and are part of the NIST Center for Building Science and Innovation (CBSI).

The Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) models are located at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and are part of the NIST Center for Building Science and Innovation (CBSI). The BECP is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and its mission is to assist state and local governments in adopting and improving building energy codes.

The BECP provides guidance and technical assistance on code development, code adoption, and code enforcement to help ensure that the latest code requirements are being met. The BECP also provides training and information on code requirements and compliance to code officials, building professionals, and other interested parties.

The BECP models are used by DOE, EERE, and other programs within the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the potential energy savings of new and existing buildings. The BECP models are also used by utilities and other organizations to assess the potential for demand-side management and other energy efficiency programs.

The BECP models are based on the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the 2009 ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The BECP incorporates updates to the IECC and Standard 90.1 that were approved by the U.S. DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program Review Committee (BPCRC) in February 2014.

The new BECP models demonstrate the potential for reducing energy use in buildings by 50% or more, compared to current construction practices.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, the new Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) models demonstrate the potential for reducing energy use in buildings by 50% or more, compared to current construction practices. The BECP is a voluntary program that provides support and guidance to states and local jurisdictions as they adopt and implement energy codes.

The new models are based on the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013. They are designed to help jurisdictions streamline the process of code adoption and reduce the cost of code compliance. The models include both prescriptive and performance-based options.

The prescriptive options provide specific requirements for energy-efficient building design and construction. The performance-based option allows builders to demonstrate that their proposed building design will achieve energy savings equivalent to or greater than the prescriptive requirements.

The new BECP models are a significant step forward in the quest to reduce energy consumption in buildings. They will help jurisdictions save money and energy, while providing flexibility to builders.

Fequently Asked Questions

  1. Question: What are the latest energy codes?

    Answer: The latest energy codes are designed to improve energy efficiency in buildings.

  2. Question: How do the latest energy codes work?

    Answer: The latest energy codes work by requiring builders, architects, and code officials to plan and design more energy-efficient buildings.

  3. Question: What are the benefits of the latest energy codes?

    Answer: The benefits of the latest energy codes include improved energy efficiency and lower energy bills.

  4. Question: How can I get more information on the latest energy codes?

    Answer: You can get more information on the latest energy codes by contacting the Building Energy Codes Program.